Sept 24, 2007

What is Submission?

This is a response to http://blog.myspace.com/index.cfm?fuseaction=blog.view&friendID=46089030&blogID=265565350

There is a beauty in the cultural dynamic that is found in the South in term of how gents/ladies interact. I wonder if you cannot make a good argument that it is the best things in life that are the most often abused; and how men and women interact in the Southern tradition is no doubt one of the ways that this occurs. Being from the North and retaining a degree of the Yankee straightforwardness that is a part of my natural personality, I can reflect on the attitudes that are inherent in the South (Tennessee) where I mostly grew up. It is a commonly understood cultural assertion that a Southern man treats a Southern Gal with a bit more care and grace then perhaps the way that a Northern couple might interact. I think that a part of this dynamic is that his treatment of his mate is one of reverence and respect that operates from a position of graciousness and care for someone who is expected to be more subservient and serving of the man in their lives. That a Southern woman seems to live more under the shadow of her Husband/boyfriend then what might be expected in other cultural archetypes is something that is both beautiful (True Graceful submission is a beautiful thing when the one who receives that one’s love treats and receives it with equal or greater reverence for the fact of the gift) but it opens a Southern Gal to a greater range of abuses. Indeed – there is dark side to Southern culture in this regard – where calous men have abused the grace that was given to them by the ones who gave themselves to them in submission and service. A woman who gives herself to and serves her husband is a beautiful thing when the man looks upon that giving with reverence and does not take it for granted. I have seen a lot of both; the abuse justified from cultural assumptions – and the beauty that is there when the man responds by giving himself to the one who gave herself. There is something very Christ-like in this – and I think a beauty of both Southern Culture and Southern women is in their capacity to reflect this certain fragile glory.